Your Brain in Love (TEDtalk)

5958884664_8de3f445f1_bYour Brain — Valentine’s Edition.

Here is Helen Fisher’s TED Talk from TED 2008. Helen’s bio on the TED website reads,

Anthropologist Helen Fisher studies gender differences and the evolution of human emotions. She’s best known as an expert on romantic love, and her beautifully penned books — including Anatomy of Love and Why We Love — lay bare the mysteries of our most treasured emotion.

This exploration of the brain’s response to love will hopefully be a fun, nerdy, and educational way to think about your loved ones during this Valentine’s Day week. Enjoy.

Want more on the brain in love?

Photo Credit: khalid Albaih via Compfight cc
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Your Brain Is Amazing (Short Video)

The good folks over at Piled Higher and Deeper created the below video based on their awesome infographic titled, “Your Brain By the Numbers.”

Coming it at only 1:17, it is well worth watching and sharing. Enjoy.

Friday Funnies

Some Friday brain humor. Enjoy.

From the Daily Ha Ha:

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From The MetaPicture:

funny-Lost-brain-sign

Also from The MetaPicture:

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Inside a toddler’s brain by Melissa Balmain in Parenting Mag, posted at BuzzFeed:

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By Mark Parisi via MyTeenageWereWolf:

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From TaMuse–The Brain’s a Troll:

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And, finally, the timelessly hilarious Gary Larson’s Far Side, posted on Inebriated Press:

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How the Brain Retains (Infographic)

The folks over at mindflash developed this infographic about how and where the brain stores it’s information. While much of the brain’s information storage system remains a mystery, it is important to remember (see what we did there?) that memory is varied, nuanced, and often associative. Working memory is different than short or long term memory and what students take away from an experience or recall about it later, cannot be dictated by anyone else. They construct knowledge and memory themselves. It is why, as educators, we must be conscientious of providing environments and experiences that are meaningful, relevant, and engaging to them.

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Anxiety and the Mind

Below is an image from a Time Magazine article on the “Anatomy of Anxiety” from a few years ago. While the article is a bit dated, the relevance remains, especially for educators.

Students need to feel relaxed, safe, and welcome in order to learn effectively. If we focus only on content and raise the stakes of assessments, we increase some students’ anxiety and make it more difficult for them to learn. A reminder that our job in working with students begins, and is sustained, through relationship building and trust.

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Image: Joel Ertola via Time 

 

Language Learning and the Developing Mind

Here is a short video from Southern California Public Radio station KPCC on the science behind bilingual learning. The site, Bilingual Learning, explores “the science, options, and dilemmas of dual language education.”

Much appreciation to Marcela Summerville (@PreKlanguages) of Spanish Workshop for Children for pointing this out to us.

Neurology of Gaming, Infographic

As with most things, “gaming” (or being engaged in video games) has both positives and negatives when it comes to developing minds. Too much gaming, and the positive effects are overshadowed by the negative.

Yet, the right balance can add another avenue for pursuing educational goals and achievement. As a result, more and more programs are using gaming to reach and teach students in ways they never could before. Therapy programs, schools, and even research scientists have all benefitted from the strategic use of games to increase successes.

Below is an infographic from Online Universities looking at the brain on games. What do you think? How have you used games in your work with students? What might we need to be cautious of in incorporating gaming in our learning environments? Share your thoughts and any resources you find valuable in the comments.

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Image: Online University